Tag Archives: TCI

The boa strikes back!

Our mission here on Big Ambergris Cay was to work on iguanas. And we did, don’t get me wrong. We collected some really good data, including some relative population abundance data through the use of road transects. Moreover, a party of two researchers from the RSPB (Royal Society for the Protection of Birds) were helping us during this trip. They were particularly interested in collecting data on the possible presence of invasive mammals like rats and mice. Luckily it seems that these rodents are not present on the island, which is, of course, good news for iguanas and the rest of the endemic fauna. Giving the additional development planned for the island, the RSPB crew will also help in the development of a biosecurity plan for Big Ambergris Cay. With incoming barges full of materials hitch-hiking of undesired animals is possible and a biosecurity plan is fundamental to keep rats off the island.

Sarah Havery, from the RSPB crew, handling a male iguana at Calicos Jack.
A female iguana hanging on a tree. When shrubs and small trees have new foliage iguanas like to climb on branches to reach out for the new leaves.
A close up of the same iguana.

The title of this post, though, gives away the fact that the great protagonists of this trip were also boas. During the week on Big Ambergris Cay we had more than one encounter with these reptiles. A couple of nights ago some of the permanent workers of the island found a rather large female boa hanging around the dorms.

Me (holding the boa’s head and body), Dr. Gerber (center) and George Waters (with the hat), processing the boa.

In previous posts I showed a few pictures of a boa having lunch with a curly tail lizard. Boas are predators, and juvenile iguanas, 1 or 2 years old, are approximately of the same size of an adult curly tail, if not smaller.

Yesterday, during our last road transect we saw and documented a boa eating a juvenile iguana. We know this happens on the island, but documented records are rather scant.

We were cruising on the island looking for iguana to log during our transect and my eyes picked the cutout of a boa on the ground. It was about 16:50 in the afternoon. Boas are generally nocturnal predators and the first thing that I thought was a road kill. We stopped to check whether the animal was one previously captured and marked. We were all surprised to find out that the boa was well alive. The one not doing so well was the juvenile hanging from its mouth.

What probably happened is that the boa found the iguana’s burrow and went right in. It likely strangled its prey in the burrow and then pulled it out to eat it outside. When we arrived the boa was taking the little iguana towards some bushes, probably to eat it away from the sun and in a more sheltered area. Here are a few shots that I took with my camera. Enjoy, comment, share.

How and what does a snake in the TCI eat again?

Imagine you want to eat something. Those who are lucky and have easy access to a food source would probably go in the kitchen, open the fridge, get some food and start eating with knife and fork. What happens if you don’t have hands, or limbs? And what if you don’t have access to an easy food source and you have to go out there and hunt down your prey?

Well, things can get a little more complicated in that case.

On Big Ambergris Cay, Turks and Caicos Islands, the rainbow boa (Chilabothrus chrysogaster) has to deal with all of these problems. And yet, it doesn’t seem to be doing too bad. The sequence of images below shows a boa, about 60 cm long, swallowing its prey. In this case the victim is a curly tail lizard (Leiocephalus psammodromus),  but larger boas can eat young and subadult iguanas too. After this pantagruelic meal the little boa will probably crawl in its retreat and digest for the following two weeks.

 

A male adult iguana was right there when this gruesome show was going on.